--- Go to the Opening Page of this web site ---

Woodblock News
Introduction | Index All the print news that fits!

Woodblock Shimbun - Introduction

The media here in Japan have been very good to me over the years. Especially during the time that I was working on the Hyakunin Isshu project, newspapers, magazines, radio and television almost never failed to respond to my requests to help me publicize my exhibitions.

I'm certainly not 'famous' here, and can walk down the street without attracting attention, but during the few days immediately following a television appearance, do find that I get recognized in the train sometimes. Generally though, people are considerate of one's privacy, and unlike the really famous foreigners here (sumo wrestlers, etc.) I live generally undisturbed.

Reading/viewing some of this material is an excellent way to get familiar with my work, so I have scanned/ripped/typed many of the items, and included them here in my 'Woodblock Shimbun'. You will find a 'Table of Contents' over on the Index Page. Please take a look at some of the material; I think you might enjoy it!

Thank you!


TV Listings

The 'Woodblock Shimbun' has a full selection of TV programs on file. Videos available include some of David's news appearances, complete feature programs, and some short documentaries on his work. The files are in QuickTime format, and can be easily viewed with your browser.
Program listings are on the Index page ...

In the wake of Hokusai

From behind his shaggy beard, affable British-born Canadian woodblock printmaker David Bull ended our interview at his studio in western Tokyo with what sounded like a challenge ... (2008)
Full Story.

Enchanting Japan

Colourful woodblock prints - for people all over the world, to hear this phrase is to think of Japan. Japan has a long history of woodblock printing, or hanga, originally for illustrations for books. By the late seventeenth century, hanga in the ukiyo-e style came into its own as an art form, and prints came to be appreciated on their own merits. The many woodblock prints that accurately depict life in the Edo period are excellent examples of this tradition. Whether a print of a geisha, a kabuki actor strutting on stage, or even a completely modern image, the woodblock printing technique seems to provide the perfect means of expression to capture the essence of things Japanese. (1998)
Full Story.

13 Another Lucky Number

David Bull is as insistent as he is stubborn. No sooner has he sat me down beside his workbench (the only warm room in the house), with younger daughter Fumi (16) creating a Web page on the computer on top of the "kotatsu," than he is demanding how much I know about "hanga" (woodblock prints). "Hanga were never made to be framed and hung on walls," he states. "Premodern Japan had no such tradition. Prints were objects, not images, to be looked at in natural light. The best way for the art of the craftsman to be appreciated is in your hands, at a window." (2002)
Full Story.