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Woodblock News
Introduction | Index All the print news that fits!

'Japanophiles'

(after clicking, give it a moment to start streaming ...)

(2010) NHK again! Their overseas arm - NHK World - asked me to appear in a pilot program for a new series they were planning, to be called Japanophiles. (No bonus points for guessing what the series was going to be about!) Host Peter Barakan and I spent a very enjoyable time in their studio putting it all together, and the result turned out to be one of the best overviews of my work made to date. And it's entirely in English ...

(After watching the program, if you would like to post some feedback with your comments, you may do so on this page of the Woodblock RoundTable.)

TV Listings

The 'Woodblock Shimbun' has a full selection of TV programs on file. Videos available include some of David's news appearances, complete feature programs, and some short documentaries on his work. The files are in QuickTime format, and can be easily viewed with your browser.
Program listings are on the Index page ...

Woodblock craftsman combines old, new

Day after day, David Bull sits in his workroom almost all day long using his energy to make hanga or woodblock prints. His workroom, housed in his four-story house standing on the side of a riverbank in Ome, Tokyo, has yet to be completed because he is building the room himself by taking time from his busy production schedule. (2004)
Full Story.

Woodblock Prints in a Different Light

"Let me ask you a silly question: Have you ever seen a woodblock print before?" ukiyo-e printmaker David Bull asked me. "Of course you have. But do you know how to look at a woodblock print?" He held a postcard-sized print under the fluorescent light in his cluttered kitchen. "Is that a woodblock print, or is it printed by a machine, or is it a photograph? (1999)
Full Story.

Carving a Career From an Ancient Japanese Craft

David Bull, a 41-year-old Canadian university dropout born in England who used to program computers and play the flute on the street, anticipates one day finding himself revered as a master practicioner of an ancient Japanese craft. But it took him 35 years to hit upon that uncommon ambition. (1993)
Full Story.