--- Go to the Opening Page of this web site ---

Woodblock News
Introduction | Index All the print news that fits!

Artist Recreates Surimono Woodblock Masterpieces

Fascinated by the beauty of Edo-style woodblock prints, Canadian artist David Bull began carving and printing his own versions of traditional Japanese prints almost 30 years ago, just to please himself.

Now living in Japan, Bull is one of a small group of craftsmen working to reproduce Japan's popular ukiyo-e and other woodblock prints.

In 1998, the Canadian printmaker completed a set of reproductions of Katsukawa Shunsho's illustrations for the 'Hyakunin lsshu' (One Hundred Poets), which is a collection of 100 poems by different poets. It took him 10 years to complete that project.

Since then, Bull has been working to reproduce prints called surimono, forgotten woodblock masterpieces that were privately printed and received only a small circulation among the general public, unlike the more famous ukiyo-e prints.

Next week, about 20 of Bull's delicately carved surimono wood-block prints will go on display at his annual exhibition at Gallery Shinjuku Takano in Tokyo's Shinjuku Ward. This show, called 'Surimono Albums' is Bull's second showing of his surimono prints.

Dating from the 1760s to 1860s, typical surimono style blends an image and poetry in one print.

Using fairly simple and straightforward styles, surimono themes included historical events, scenes from kabuki dramas, still-lifes and seasonal landscapes in nature.

Bull uses the same traditional techniques that the original craftsmen used, and his show will feature fine carvings and prints, including reproductions of Toyota Hokkei's Spring Fuji, Kitao Shigemasa's Yoshiwara Courtesan, Isoda Koryusai's Peony and Sparrow, Katsushika Hokusai's Soshi the Philosopher, Ando Hiroshige's Evening Rain at Eitai Bridge, Yashima Gakutei's Warrior and Tiger and many more.

TV Listings

The 'Woodblock Shimbun' has a full selection of TV programs on file. Videos available include some of David's news appearances, complete feature programs, and some short documentaries on his work. The files are in QuickTime format, and can be easily viewed with your browser.
Program listings are on the Index page ...

Shokunin vs Craftsman

During the seven years that I have been living here in Japan and studying woodblock printmaking, I have visited many shokunin and have enjoyed long discusions with them about their life and work. I have been surprised by many of the things they have said, and have come to realize that their thinking is sometimes quite different from my Western conceptions of a craftsman. (1993)
Full Story.

Recapturing Edo Images

Squatting in front of a photocopy of an ukiyo-e print in the light from a 50-watt bulb, David Bull puts his carving knife carefully to a block of cherry wood. Under his blade, the image of an elaborately robed Heian minister slowly begins to emerge. "The hardest thing about making woodblock prints is the carving of intricate lines - you have to be able to use your knife like a brush in order to do justice to the fine lines," Bull says. (1989)
Full Story.

Woodblock Man Carves Niche

Woodblock carver David Bull refuses to be called an 'artist' or 'sensei'. "I'm just the guy who carves a piece of wood," Bull said. "All I do is copy what the real artists did." Since 1989, the Canadian university dropout who once played the flute on the streets of London has spent many hours bent over his woodblocks, nose and beard almost touching the surface, as he carved toward a self-appointed goal: the recreation of 18th century ukiyo-e artist Katsukawa Shunsho's 'Hyakunin Isshu: Poems from One Hundred Poets' series. (1999)
Full Story.