Your First Print : Support Forum
http://woodblock.com/support/

Waste wood between lines, and clearing
http://woodblock.com/support/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=117
Page 1 of 1

Author:  Matthew Downs [ Sun Jan 18, 2015 7:13 am ]
Post subject:  Waste wood between lines, and clearing

Hello!

Been practicing my cutting, and watching some of your videos on Youtube. I notice that as you're cutting with the hangi-to between lines, the waste wood from the block is popping up making it easy to brush away and clear. How does it do that? Whenever have to cut between lines (like the little v formed between two stalks of rice) no wood pops up. And I end up having to go back in with the sankaku-to trying to dig it out. I thought maybe it was because I wasn't cutting deep enough with the hangi-to? But I feel like I'm pushing as hard as I can without losing control of where the blade is going.

Does this make sense?

Spent the day trying to recarve some blocks (same design I'd already done, just made some new blocks) that I thought I could do better and ended up just butchering the blocks and my confidence.

Author:  David Bull [ Sun Jan 18, 2015 8:13 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Waste wood between lines, and clearing

Matthew Downs wrote:
I notice that as you're cutting with the hangi-to between lines, the waste wood from the block is popping up making it easy to brush away and clear. How does it do that?

Hi Matthew … thanks for contributing to the forum!

The only way that the wood can 'popup' and float away, is if it has been completely cut free from the surrounding wood. It sounds like perhaps you are cutting straight down (or not much angle), and the in-between pieces of wood are thus still attached at the bottom. Try holding your knife at a steeper (shallower?) angle, so that the left and right cuts meet underneath. The wood should then pop out.

Of course, this is only possible when the two opposing cuts are close together. Once they are too far apart, it's pointless to try and have the wood come free - you have to remove it later with the aisuki.

You also mention using the 'sankaku-to' (V-gouge); I can perhaps add that I don't have one of those … they were never used in the old traditional cutting system …

Dave

Author:  Matthew Downs [ Sun Jan 18, 2015 11:56 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Waste wood between lines, and clearing

I also notice you never used the v-gouge. :) I think maybe it's a bad (?) habit from my staring with carving keishi-gum prints. I was using the five tool set kids in elementary school use, and when carving the gum found that the v-gouge was much easier to use to cur around lines than anything else. I felt I had more control with it. Then I'd use the u-gouge to clear away larger spaces.

I must be holding the tool wrong or something. Cause I do tend to hold it straight up. Or at an angle away from the line I'm cutting. If I try to hold it at an angle toward the line, like you do in your videos, I have trouble seeing where I'm cutting.

Also, I've only just started using the fist grip you use. Before I always held my tools like I did a pencil. But with wood cutting I often slip while cutting and cut further than I want, cutting over lines, and making mistakes. The fist grip is taking some getting used to, but I do notice that I have a bit more control. However, as with the angle problem above, I find that when I put my thumb behind the blade (pushing 9, while pulling 10), I have trouble seeing the line I'm cutting. I'm constantly stopping my cutting to adjust the board so that I can get a better look.

I feel like I'm doing a lot of this so wrong.

PS. Yeah, I apologize for spamming up the boards with my questions. I don't really have anyone else to go to with questions! :)

Author:  David Bull [ Sun Jan 18, 2015 12:50 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Waste wood between lines, and clearing

Please, there's no 'spam' involved here … just honest questions. Don't sweat it …

It is indeed sometimes difficult to see where the cut is going. Get your head pushed forward so that you are looking straight down at the cut entrance, and of course keep a good strong light on that place. And you're not looking at the 'point' of the blade, but at a place a short distance up from the tip. You have to try to behave like a good driver, and always think 'in advance' of where you actually are ...

Page 1 of 1 All times are UTC
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
http://www.phpbb.com/